In the mere act of transcribing world into picture, three dimensions into two, photographers necessarily manufacture the image they make. Artifice of one kind or another is therefore an inescapable part of photographic life. (Batchen 2002: 139)

I feel that a photograph is unique in its nature from other art forms as part of its essence is about the creation of what has existed in front of the lens and the photographer. In this context, it can be seen as an authentic representation of what has been seen.

The questions that then arrive to us are about the Philosophical and Phenomenological nature of the truth of the photograph, and how (and why) the photograph has been produced in the first place. What were the reasons behind the image, what is the purpose of it being shown, how should be re-act when viewer and what will be taken away with us?

In acting, the question of being truthful on stage is paramount, and techniques over the last 100 years (or so) since Stanislavski set out his principles of the actor have been questioned, developed and enhanced. Theatre can be seen and experienced through a prism of realism, naturalism, experimental, immersive, invisible and avant-garde. Though the truth of the performance and its reception by the audience. We approach performance with preconceptions, but also an open mind. We want to submerge ourselves within the world of the play but at the same time hold onto our own reality.

“In the mere act of transcribing world into picture, three dimensions into two, photographers necessarily manufacture the image they make. Artifice of one kind or another is, therefore, an inescapable part of photographic life.” (Batchen 2002: 139)

With this in mind I am not sure I agree totally with Snyder and Allen’s assumption “…we do not need more philosophizing about photographs and reality” ((Syder and Allen 1975: 169) as we continue to develop new and exciting methods of analysis, through examining the nature of our relationship to the world around us. I see their point of view to focus on the analytical tools already in existence and devised, but as photographers and artists continue to explore and develop processes, examine how work is created and produced, attempt and present work with different immersive qualities, we need to continue our analysis and challenge our own assumptions as to the meaning, quality, nature and concept of photographic images.

References

BATCHEN, Geoffrey. 2001. Each Wild Idea: Writing, Photography, History. MIT Press.

Snyder, J., & Allen, N. W. 1975. Photography, Vision, and Representation. In Critical Enquiry, Autumn, 1975. pp. 143-169. The University of Chicago Press.